Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Pojagi Panel #2


For this, my second pojagi panel, I used two colors of shot cotton, a magenta and a peach... Neither are colors that I am currently drawn to, but I thought they would work well in this venue.


Using 2 colors instead of 1 allowed me to play a bit more with the stained glass effect that this type of patchwork offers.


The piecing is all improvised, (I'd go insane if I had to sew something like this from a pattern!)


The seams on this panel were done differently then on my first panel, (which you can see here). To learn how the seams were stitched on both panels, see my tutorial in the post below!

36 comments:

Amy said...

Beautiful!

Hollie said...

Super gorgeous! I love it!

Michelle Engel Bencsko said...

Wow! I just saw your other post on how to do this and I had no idea what you'd been up to... amazing work, Vic!! Loving the stained glass vibe.

Cherry pips said...

Wow, so beautiful! I know what you mean about the two colours, but they work here so well and really create an antique stained glass impression. Fab stuff!

corinnea said...

I really appreciate you sharing your adventures with fabric. You go places I am not sure I'm ready for yet but would like to one day. I will probably try something with this style first. You've got me thinking...

Marit said...

Your panel is beautiful! Thank you for generously sharing the tutorial. I'd like to try this...

; )

Love the soft contrast of the two colors you used - so lovely...

nicolette said...

Beautiful Pojagi artwork! I like the window that you use to display your projects!

Ethne said...

Oh I love this - this is another thing for the to do list

Karen Turner said...

Glorious, especially in a window with the light coming through. I enjoyed the tutorials too - thank you!

Stephanie said...

Beautiful. Definitely a stained glass look.

BaileyGirl5 said...

I love the way this panel looks with the light shining through. I would never get tired of such an interesting and beautiful window. I bet it looks different at various times of the day and it's always beautiful.

Diva Quilts said...

Lovely!!!

Barbara said...

With great interest, I followed your posts on the process of creating the first panel, which I thought was complete and total perfection.

Then you make the second one! OMG ! the gentle contrast of the two colors is sublime - so subtle but there - just beautiful.

Thanks so much for taking all the time to write and photo the seam tuts - I very much appreciate that

Martys Fiber Musings said...

I love this style...will blog about this on our local quilt guild's blog. With a link back to you, of course! I also looked at the handsewn patchwork by Mai that you linked to in an earlier blog. Her work is also wonderful. Thanks for sharing the joy!

Linda said...

This is stunning! Wow! I love this! Thanks for sharing all the info about the seams, etc. Just wonderful!

connie said...

Victoria this is awesome! Your workmanship is incredible. I just love the light and dark stained glass effect.

Pallas said...

This piece is stunning.

dosfishes said...

Love this, I could see this technique making a fabulous coat! A collage of color.

Cheryl Arkison said...

Oddly, I was thinking of you and these pieces as we drove through the vineyards last week. Not an entirely odd connection as the fields are easily interpreted through this construction.

Allie said...

This is so beautiful!!!! Did you do each seam as you went?

Fer said...

Stunning! Makes me think of stained glass. :)

Hey Harriet said...

Sweet! It does look like stained glass! So this is what has kept you so quiet lately! It's lovely Vic!

Deborah said...

Amazing how much it looks like stained glass. It's beautiful!

picciolo said...

these are truely beautiful Victoria
: )

High Desert Diva said...

I really think an art gallery installation of this series is in order. A traveling show would work well....especially one that traveled (with artist) to Oregon.

Diane J. Evans said...

Beautiful, Victoria! Back when I was a teenager, we were taught to use the method you shared in Tutorial #2 with sheer fabrics. It was called a flat-felled seam, I believe. What a great effect it has when you hang the pieces in the light -- breathtaking!

Diane

elenor said...

thank for that good tutorial!
when I saw your first pojagi work I hoped for a tutorial!
these pieces are so beautiful!

liebe gruesse aus Austria!

Diana Trout {Nan.DT@verizon.net} said...

Thank you for this very interesting tute and all the info on pojagi. I always see some wonderful here.

Walden said...

Beautiful! I really love these.

QuiltSwissy said...

Oh man, this is me! I practiced the seaming on my scraps I should have been using for my 15 minute blocks....oops!

I love the stained glass technique. This is definitely me. Thank you so much for the tutorial.

So...where do you get your shot cotton? I found several outlets, and think I got a great price...

glen

Victoria said...

Thanks everyone for your kind words and enthusiasm!

Allie, yes each seam is done one at a time... sew, fold, press, fold, press again and sew again... then add another piece of fabric and do all over again!

QuiltSissy, So far I have gotten shot cottons in local shops, quilt shows and online, primarily from Pink Chalk Fabrics.

Gabriela López García said...

Beautifull and very interesting!!!
Gaby

XUE said...

Gorgeous work as always, Vic! It is such a pleasure whenever you post as it is always something of wonder! Love the views beyond the windows too! Where's my barn? Still building?

patchworkpalace said...

I really like this..great for hanging in a hall way in a long thin window. I have a stained glass window in my hallway that has a very similar feel and goes from red to orange to yellow to green to blue.

Colleen MacDonald said...

It really does remind me of stained glass... it's just lovely.

Sherry said...

Wonderful. I just recently learned of this style of needlework (love Pinterest). I have been buying various pastel organzas to make a curtain for my east facing dining room window. I never considered that I might be able to sew it by machine. Now I am inspired to get at it.