Friday, June 18, 2010

Breaking the Shell


Many thanks to you all, as I was really touched and encouraged by the comments left after my last post. By that evening things started to become clearer to me, and the shell began to crack open. I realized that the reason I was having a hard time translating the lines and shapes that were in my mind into quilts, is because this time, I wasn't suppose to put them into quilts... I was suppose to just put them into cloth.


Wanting to keep going with the theme of utilitarian patchwork, I turned to Pojagi, (which is a type of Korean patchwork, often used to make square wrapping cloth) for inspiration.

Traditionally, (from what I can gather) Pojagi is constructed with hand stitched french seams, that are then tacked down with very small hand stitches. However despite my love of hand stitching, I knew that I didn't want to do it that way, (as I tried it once and didn't like it!)

I kept thinking about it and as I fell asleep I saw how I might do it on the machine, and the next morning I woke up and started to create a humble little panel out of muslin.


I joined my patchwork with machine stitched traditional seams, pressing them open, and tucking the raw edges in, then stitching them down... (and I enjoyed the process very much this time!)


To continue the play of light and shadow that this work encourages, I also added a little pocket where a leaf can be tucked into.

Now my mind is expanding with new ideas, and it feels wonderful. My next experiment with this construction method will be a long and narrow cloth runner made with shot cottons. Can hardly wait!

31 comments:

kheli said...

I love pojaji! I have a friend from Korea, she says they pass the pojaji down through generations, just like we do quilts. They may start as scraps, but they are treasured! Glad you have cracked it open!

beth said...

This is lovely. Isn't it fun when your mind is full of new ideas and inspiration? Enjoy!

Fer said...

Just beautiful! It really is a perfect example of 'less is more'.

So glad you cracked the shell!

Michelle Engel Bencsko said...

This is the most beautiful piece of patchwork I've seen in a long while. Stunning, Victoria.

Margo said...

just absolutely beautiful. So satisfying to my eye.

Suzanne said...

I can truely see your inspiration in your work...the essence of the light in your photos shines through and translates beautifully in the stitches. Thank you

soggybottomflats said...

Gorgeous work! I love this piece. Your work is so creative and fresh. Thank you for sharing, Elaine

Minka's Studio said...

You continue to come up with original ideas! This has a nice summertime feel to it. Love the pocket for the leaf.

kelly said...

Oh, Victoria! Once again, you have outdone yourself. I absolutely LOVE this! So beautiful!

artymess said...

its just as important to have a period of incubation....so that renews the creativity.....lovely work...

Amy C said...

so very beautiful, I love white, I always have all white bedlinen, so simple and peaceful.

dosfishes said...

I love the thought of the real leaf in the pocket. Glad your incubation has cracked. xox Corrine

XUE said...

I'm familiar with Pojagi too & I love the way how your fabulous piece complements your window frame!

Cheryl Arkison said...

Simply lovely.

kay susan said...

That's not a humble little panel, it's beautiful!

Rossie said...

beautiful

9patchnurse said...

Love it! I've toyed with ideas for patchwork window treatments and this is so refreshing. I never heard of Pojagi before, I better google it quick.

THE MOM said...

This is really neat. I have never heard of pojagi before and just checked out more about it. I love that your ispiration is of things found and reflects the past. It makes it timeless, but then you added the leaf pocket (like the pockets shown on the pojagi clothing I saw) and made it fresh too. I love how the creative process takes shape. Thank you for sharing. I too have been using japanese art for inspiration. I have been using haiku to describe a thing or emotion, then using that as inspiration to reinterpret the haiku as an art quilt. So far, just on paper - but the plan is there.

Diane J. Evans said...

Love the image of "breaking the shell" -- your break-out piece is simply lovely!

Diane

Kristin L said...

Lovely. Your inspirational photos have soft, weathered neutrals and fine lines and the pojagi technique reflects that well. This will certainly be a wonderful creative path!

karen said...

beautiful, fragile work Victoria.

Darcy said...

I love seeing how your work is constantly evolving! SO beautiful!

Ellen said...

How nice this is!

Ellen

picciolo said...

This is beautiful! In glad your ideas got past the block, its wonderful when they start flowing again
: )

Hey Harriet said...

Oh Vic I LOVE LOVE LOVE that piece! I can so see it hanging in my home! I wish!!! It's truly beautiful! I'm keen to see more of these Pojagi inspired pieces! You amaze me!

nicolette said...

It looks so fragile and beautiful!

It’s wonderful to learn about another carfting technique like Pojagi! Can’t wait to see more!

Do said...

Great idea! I love everything about it!

Deborah said...

A beautiful piece of work!

Colleen MacDonald said...

That is so lovely it gave me a little shiver when I saw it.

deemallon said...

well, this was worth incubating over! I love how much the Pojagi piece has the look and feel of the weathered barn in the previous post.

Diva Quilts said...

I'm so glad your heart/soul is moving again - I love your work and your progress as you fashion the most amazing textile constructions.

Loving your take on Pojaji - like you - what stopped me was the idea of all those french seams. *ack!* This is a beautiful and perhaps more contemporary take on the theme. ;)