Sunday, October 9, 2011

R.I.P. (until springtime comes)


Thanks so much for all of the great comments in my last post concerning what to do with the eco-dyed quilt top that I was less then thrilled about, I enjoyed reading each and every one.


Despite all of the good and tempting ideas, I decided to stick with my original plan and just simply bury the thing.

So it wouldn't be lonely during its winter slumber, I buried a few other fabric and patchwork bits with it.


I buried the cloth where the tomato plants had grown this summer, and left some of the dropped cherry size ones in the hole.


To mark this temporary grave site I added a few bundles of tied fabric that I had put out in the yard a few weeks ago... more erosion experiments... and properly placed some flowers on top out of respect. For good measure, I also circled it in stones in case a wind storm came and blew the fabric bundles away.

Now we just wait, and in 6 months or so, we will dig it all up and see what transformations to the cloth have occur. Hoping for some good discoloration and lovely decaying areas, that will inspire something interesting!

20 comments:

Toni said...

Such an interesting experiment! Can't wait to see the results!

Kim said...

Did you add anything like keys or metal to add to the staining?
Okay now don't forget to show us......this is intersting.
Have you seen this done before?

Happy Sewing

Esch House Quilts said...

What an interesting experiment! Even though you weren't crazy about the quilt, it still takes some guts to bury the whole thing in the yard :)

Good thought about the stones too - I'd forget where I put it!

Can't wait to see it in the spring.

Victoria said...

Kim, no, I didn't add any rusty or metal things. I though about it, but since I can pretty easily rust fabric anytime by just incasing vinegar dampened material and rusty objects together in a zip-lock baggie, I decided to keep it super simple and just concentrate on what plain, old earth would do. (I suppose I could have added more vegetable matter and some fallen leaves to help with composting... maybe I will re-dig it up and add those elements...??)

As for seeing this done before, years ago I once saw a quilt in a Quilt National exhibit that was made with assorted fabrics, (I think some were cotton, others silk and also some velvet) all of which had been buried for about half of a year in a riverbed. The results were fabulous. (I would think that the element of constant water would definitely accelerate the decomposing).

Possible all I will end up with is mud incrusted fabric, who knows? But It's worth a try if only to satisfy my curiosity.

Filamental said...

Enterprising and funny, you are. I love it.
This will be so thought provoking. I am wondering what color tomato will dye. I will wonder all winter.
The more I look at the picture of the quilt top the more I like it.
It reminds me of Andersen's Split Pea Soup, which is delicious.
One more thing, be glad you did not put anything that will rust. Rust dyed spots are very difficult to get a thread and needle through for quilting.

Ethne said...

I look forward to seeing the springtime results - this will be really interesting

deanna7trees said...

great experiment. I predict lots of magic will happen in 6 months. can hardly wait.

Diane J. Evans said...

What a whimsical way to explore and experiment, Victoria -- can't wait to see the magical outcome.

Diane

Angela said...

It looks to me that the right verb to apply in this situation is not "bury" but "sow".
You have sown a quilt top in the fall and will blossom in the spring. Mother Earth will make the magic.

FryeStyle said...

I can't wait to see how the tomatoes add to the mix! Looking forward to the reveal!

Rachel said...

It will certainly be fascinating to see what happens over the winter. Just don't forget where you've buried them!

Kathleen said...

Wonderful experiment! I will be anxious to see what happens to your quilt after its sojourn in the underworld. I wish I had a river nearby to see the effect running water would have on fabric... I have a bundle of fabric eroding on my fence and I've heard it is supposed to be another stormy winter...maybe that will count as running water, lol!

Candied Fabrics said...

Ooh, what an awesome experiment - I can't wait to see what happens! :-)

Rachel Hauser said...

curious and curiouser. The best part will be seeing what it inspires you to create.

Cheryl Arkison said...

I always love what you do, but this is so seriously awesome.

Fibra Artysta said...

*sigh* Now I want to bury fabric... :)

Nina said...

I love the spirit of experimentation... I've been known to put socks in the compost bin, although that was more to see if they'd biodegrade than for any artistic purposes. (They did, eventually, except for the elastane in the cuffs.) Looking forward to the springtime exhumation.

Katrina said...

the perfect solution! i agree that sometimes we need to bury our own work, or put it to rest somehow. hope it was cathartic. and lightening.

Cheryl said...

I love this idea. I've been rearranging my quilt closet and have a few UFO that I don't want to complete or that I simply don't like. We have a couple of acres of potential burial plots for all these pieces. Thanks for the inspiration, Victoria.
Cheryl

Lynda said...

I am moved by your work! I love the photo of the trees and glistening snow and I am very interested to see the result of your experiment this spring.